Questions regarding Locksmithing school, training and the job at large. : Locksmith


I’ve recently taken an interest in the profession of locksmithing and believe it would be a rewarding and satisfying career; I did however have several questions I’d like to throw out there to get input from those who have studied the trade or are currently working in locksmithing.

I reside in the state of Arizona(where no license is required) and have found a locksmithing school that offers a 2 week course that can be reattended at any time and includes $500 dollars worth of equipment for a course total of $2995. I am wondering if that is a good deal.

As I understand it, once someone has the knowledge and tools to be in locksmithing it is largely up to them as far as putting their name out there and getting exposure for the jobs they’d work. Is it possible to work for any company large or small in the locksmithing trade for a steady income or is running your own business for locksmithing the route most everyone takes?



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Another farmhouse job. I did one of these today. The customer wanted to keep the integrity of ‘this old house’ and bought this kit. All in all it wasn’t a direct drop in replace ment so I had to fill some holes and drill some new. The lock is solid but the screws could have been thicker and longer.


Another farmhouse job. I did one of these today. The customer wanted to keep the integrity of 'this old house' and bought this kit. All in all it wasn't a direct drop in replace ment so I had to fill some holes and drill some new. The lock is solid but the screws could have been thicker and longer. submitted by /u/jacobnbr1
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1952 Cadillac ignition. I just learned how to pick and remove the ignition on older GM locks. Very fun job to tinker around with and learn. The sidebar in GM locks is one hell of a mechanism for the 50s! : Locksmith


what is truly amazing is GM used very similar ignition switches up thru 1990 on P30 vans.

https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.php?pk=942141&cc=1059331&jsn=2517

the flats for the D shaped hole are in different spots on the later versions. but there is enough room to file a new flat to keep the alignment. the connector pigtails have a slightly different shape but the terminals can be moved easily from the early connector body to the new connector body without having to recrimp them.

working in a cadillac restoration shop in the 80s.. the bosses had a big box of GM keys . they would get a car in and find keys that fit and leave the keys with that car.. cutting down on the box of keys.. i finally got them to let me figure out the depths and cut new keys by depth and put the originals back in the box..

somebody threw away my list of 102 try out keys for GM locks decades ago. long before i worked at the caddy shop.. at one time in the late 80s, we had 7, 59 Eldorado Biarritz convertables in the shop for restoration .. just thought i would share..



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Fun job today. Customer took the cover off to “lube it” but it all came in jingling in a zip lock. Its all good now. : Locksmith


I think you have to ask for the flair. I refuse to ask, because I prefer to earn the appellation with the golden quality of my locksmith-minutiae-laden posts.

The picture of the inside of that Schlage L94XX reminds me of my favorite factory screwup that illustrates the importance of putting these locks together exactly the way they came from the factory. That little plastic piece in the lower left that holds back the fire activated latch blocker… it’s mushroom shaped with the fat part towards the lock case cover. Back in ’03 or so we installed over 250 Omnilock locks on a high school. They used a modified Schlage L mortise lock that included a little electric motor at the top right to lock and unlock the hub. The company that modified them apparently employed a dodo who put the locks back together with that mushroom shaped plastic piece with the fat side first, then stuck the spring loaded latch blocker onto it afterwards, obviously because it’s easier than holding the blocker down and putting the plastic bit in after. It looks OK upon a cursory examination, but this little “assembly shortcut” started to bite us in the ass after a few years. Without the fat part of the “mushroom” holding it in, the door being used would gradually cause the latch blocker to walk towards the mortise case cover. Eventually, it reaches the gap between the cover and the end of the plastic piece and pops up, blocking the latch. This makes the door difficult to open from either side without forcing the handle very hard and deforming that piece. This event is particularly amusing when it happens to someone in a bathroom or other single door room. We keep thinking we got them all because there’s no incident for months, but then I had one do it last week.



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