Another farmhouse job. I did one of these today. The customer wanted to keep the integrity of ‘this old house’ and bought this kit. All in all it wasn’t a direct drop in replace ment so I had to fill some holes and drill some new. The lock is solid but the screws could have been thicker and longer.


Another farmhouse job. I did one of these today. The customer wanted to keep the integrity of 'this old house' and bought this kit. All in all it wasn't a direct drop in replace ment so I had to fill some holes and drill some new. The lock is solid but the screws could have been thicker and longer. submitted by /u/jacobnbr1
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Apparently gatehouse (or some “locksmith”) doesn’t know what macs are or why they’re important. I had a residential eviction today. Started picking and it took me longer than normal for these shitty locks. When I got the knob picked, I pulled it so I could just make a key and unlock the db. 76277 : Locksmith


I am not a locksmith, can someone explain to me why you don’t see cuts like this more often? Seems like it would be a whole lot more secure, adding that OP said it was hard to pick. Every house key I’ve had rarely had cuts with depths that differed more than 1-2 – In other words I’ve always felt my homes would be incredibly easy to bump-key or pick



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Help me identify this safe? Know the combo, but the batteries died, and I no longer have the power cord. : Locksmith


Does the power cord have a built in transformer / rectifier ?

You could probably just rig up an old power cord to work by stripping the rubber away and attaching them to the leads on the input

If it does have a transformer/rectifier built in, then you could look for one of those universal adapters they sold at radio shack. Usually they have converters

Check on the label near the plug (assuming it has one)

It will say current / voltage etc there



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